Friday, November 13, 2009

Security Landscaping - Part Four - Types of Thorny Plants


The next step to security landscaping is thorny plants. It’s easy to see why intruders hate these plants because we hate to prune and trim them for the same reasons. But if security and defense are your wishes, these are great protectors and they look good to. Be forewarned: I had to look up the more official names and descriptions to most of these plants, so get someone in the know to help you.



Professional landscapers have often said that planting thorny thicket hedges, etc. is a very reliable way to secure your yard or home from intruders. However, careful planning and pruning is needed or these same hedges can become cover for intruders instead. Don't plant these kinds of thorny plants where children play, climb or dig with their hands.

These shrubs can and do draw blood! Thorny plants also tend to collect trash and leaves. So make sure you wear thick gloves, longs sleeves, long pants and sturdy shoes, when pruning or removing debris that gets caught in the branches of these babies.




If you live rurally, the fruit that some of these plants produce may draw four-legged interlopers and livestock closer to your home than you would like. So research and plan carefully.

As with any plant, be sure to ascertain the plant’s growth habit and size at full maturity, before purchasing or planting. You want to make sure it’s scale and pruning needs match your lifestyle and your home. Also beware of non-native plants and try to find out if they will become intrusive in your environment. If they do, they will become way more work for you than the security they provide. I learned this lesson the hard way.




Some plants that are likely to wound intruders are: dwarf conifers, such as bird's nest spruces; low growing shrubs, such as English yews and globose blue spruces (Picea pungens), also known as "Glauca Globosa"; or thorny plants that stay small, about three to four feet high and wide. One shrub that people aren't likely to hide behind, with its tight mass of thorny leaves, is Rotunda Chinese holly; hardy oranges (Poncirus trifoliata); and devil's walking stick (Aralia spinosa) are also good.

The final installment in this special series on security landscaping will be:

Security Landscaping - Part Five - Additional Types of Thorny Plants

CK, a 50 something, soon to be rural homesteading Prepper.

5 comments:

Cecile said...

This will surely work. At this time and age, securing our home does not begin and end with securing our house. It should start outside the house, and the best place there is, our garden.

snohomish landscaping

lanscaping said...

The first thing always is, as you have said, take a walk around your yard. Then have a look at magazines and websites (like this one!) and library books. The librarian will suggest books for you.

landscaping said...

The first thing always is, as you have said, take a walk around your yard. Then have a look at magazines and websites (like this one!) and library books. The librarian will suggest books for you.

longislandlandscaping said...

This is one thing I like about landscaping, you can always plan for the kind of plants that you want to grow in your garden. It's good that sites like this provides surfers with the essential ideas they need to make a smart landscaping online free consultation.

Jade Graham said...

bush like clumps that were easy to glue onto the armature with Quick Grab Tacky. Softfall

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